• Category Archives Student Work
  • Holy Mola Batman, It’s Sleeping Cats!

    I teach a lot of classes every year and I’ve been teaching them for many years. Much of the time, my student’s work flies off like fledged birds that make their way out into the world without a backward glance but every so often one returns, all grown up, for a visit.

    Jane's Mola of a Navajo pot.
    Jane’s Mola of a Navajo pot.

    I got two such visits  in the last week, one never flew far from home as it is still waiting to fully develop its wings in a friends studio who I see on a regular basis though this little bird has been modestly out of sight the days I’ve spent there sewing with my friend; I had to ask her to coax it out so I could take this photo; this is my friend Jane’s Mola of a Navajo pot; I created the pattern but she is the first person to actually make it.

    Then, just the other day I was teaching a machine quilting class at the Montavilla Sewing Center in Gresham and one of my students had brought in a quilt she made from a class she had taken from me a few yeas back. Here is Rita’s ‘Let Sleeping Cats Lie’  quilt.

    Kudos to both Jane and Rita and thank you for letting me share your work with everyone.

    Rita's 'quilt - Let Sleeping Cats Lie.
    Rita’s ‘quilt – Let Sleeping Cats Lie.

  • The Green Man

    Folklore and Mythology is rich with references to The Green Man. Known in many cultures, he is most prevalent in Celtic mythology. The Green Man is the male aspect of Mother Nature, he is consort to the Earth Mother Goddess and their union is the foundation of the Pagan May festival of Beltane.

    The Green Man is portrayed as a hirsute man whose locks and facial hair are represented by leaves and branches. Sometimes he is pictured with horns like a stag.

    Once a month, I hold an Art Journal Quilt class in which we explore techniques and design a bit more in the artistic realm than those usually found in quilting classes. A couple of months ago, the assignment was to create a collage of the Green Man starting with a printed or traced face and embellishing it with a collage of fussy cut leaves and flowers. At the last class, a couple of students brought their completed Green Man quilts for ‘Show & Crow’ and I’m posting them here for your enjoyment.

    If you are curious or interested in the Journal Quilt classes, we meet monthly at two locations in Portland – The first Friday of each month at Pioneer Quilts in Milwaukie, and the last Friday of each month at Sewn Loverly in Wilsonville. Contact the shops for details or to register.

    Joy's Green Man Quilt
    Joy’s Green Man Quilt
    Ardie's Green Man Quilt
    Ardie’s Green Man Quilt

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  • Show & Crow April 20, 2017

    Good readers, it’s time for a Show and Crow. Not of my work but that of a couple of my students. I just wrapped up a landscape quilt design class today at Pioneer Quilts; this was a two part class I called ‘From Photo to Fabric’. Students brought a landscape photo and from it created a pattern for a quilt. The class was small – three students – but that did give them room to spread out plus more one-on-one time with me.

    Two of the students got about halfway done with their quilts and kudos to them, the quilts are looking FANTASTIC!. I just had to share these with you. I took photos of their quilts in progress with their original source photos included so you can see what they have achieved so far and also the final goal.

    Jill’s quilt features a lake (or river?) in New Zealand in a technique I call ‘Striplique’, a blending of strip piecing and applique. The strip piecing is ideal for water features and meadows. She still has to add the tree silhouetted on the right and plans to use a confetti technique to render the lacy details on the tree. She may add some stones fussy cut from a landscape fabric on the shoreline.

    Jill's New Zealand lake.
    Jill’s New Zealand lake.

    Charlotte chose a rural landscape with a rusty farm gate on a gravel road with a meadow and trees against a backdrop of hills. She also plans to render the tree that will be positioned on the right hand side of her picture in fabric confetti and used the strip piecing to create the layers of meadow grasses in the middle ground; she also was intrigued by a technique I showed of insetting strips of fringed raw edged fabric between the strip pieced seams to make three dimensional rafts of grasses for an ethereal, airy look and texture. She plans to add the rustic gate with stuffed bias bars applied after the rest of the landscape is completed. I have included a closer view highlighting the frayed fabric grasses on her quilt.

    Charlotte's rural meadow scene.
    Charlotte’s rural meadow scene.
    Charlotte's landscape close-up to show the frayed three dimensional grasses.
    Charlotte’s landscape close-up to show the frayed three dimensional grasses.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The third student is making a view of the Columbia River gorge with the Vista House on a nearby hill and Beacon Rock off in the distance; the foreground will be a riot of foliage and flowers. She was newer to quilt making and got most of her background pieces prepared with adhesive and ready to fuse but did not get far enough along for a meaningful photograph.

    All three have promised me photos of their finished projects and I hope to show those in a future post.